in ,

Epinephrine is the only effective treatment for anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can potentially lead to death if not promptly treated. Allergic reactions typically begin suddenly after exposure to an allergen, which may be a food, medication, insect sting, or another trigger. Anaphylaxis can occur in anyone at any time; it can sometimes be triggered by allergens that a person has only had mild reactions to in the past — or to which they have never reacted to before.

Recognizing anaphylaxis

A mild allergic reaction may consist of hives, itching, flushing, swelling of the lips or tongue, or some combination of these.

However, throat swelling or tightening, trouble breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath, cough, lightheadedness, fainting, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or a sense of impending doom, are all symptoms of anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction can vary from one episode to the next, even in the same individual.

How should anaphylaxis be treated?

It is important to quickly recognize anaphylaxis so it can be promptly treated with epinephrine, the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is a hormone made by the adrenal glands. It works within minutes to prevent progression and reverse the symptoms of anaphylaxis.

People may wonder if they should administer epinephrine if they suspect — but aren’t sure — that they are having an anaphylactic reaction. The answer is yes. Epinephrine should be administered without delay if there is any concern or suspicion of anaphylaxis, because the risk of an untreated severe allergic reaction outweighs the risk of inappropriately receiving epinephrine.

Furthermore, delays in epinephrine administration can result in more severe reactions, and possibly even death. Individuals carrying an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, Adrenaclick, others) should use it immediately if they suspect an anaphylactic reaction, and then call 911. If you don’t carry an epinephrine autoinjector, call 911 right away.

Anyone who has been treated with epinephrine after an anaphylactic reaction should be transported by ambulance to an emergency room, where they will continue to be monitored. This is because some people who have had an anaphylactic reaction may have protracted anaphylaxis, with symptoms lasting several hours (or possibly days). Others may have biphasic anaphylaxis, which is a recurrence of symptoms several hours (or possibly days) after symptoms resolve, even without further exposure to the allergic trigger. For both protr

 » Read More

Report

What do you think?

Written by Shobha

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Loading…

0
sarah-paulson-seemingly-shades-lea-michele-when-asked-about-her-alleged-on-set-behavior

Sarah Paulson Seemingly Shades Lea Michele When Asked About Her Alleged On-Set Behavior

black-and-brown-surfing-community

Black and Brown surfing community