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Valentine’s Day Google searches

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If you’re single on Valentine’s Day, you’re most likely spending a lot of time on the internet. Even if you’re in a relationship, there are plenty of causes for anxiety that might drive you to seek the comfort of the world’s best confidante — Google. Satellite Internet used Google Trends to conduct an analysis of the most popular Valentine’s Day search words, which show what exactly is on Americans’ minds, and it’s not exactly encouraging. This map gives a state-by-state breakdown of the most popular Google search terms across the country on Valentine’s Day.

Map of valentine's day search terms

Photo: DrimaFilm/Shutterstock

For 23 states, “break up” is the most popular search term. That means Americans either have a startling fear of commitment, or Valentine’s Day is a strangely popular day for relationships to end. On the flip side of things, states like South Carolina, Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Virginia are embracing their romantic side, searching for “poetry.” In a similarly romantic vein, a concerning number of states are searching for “the bachelor,” perhaps looking for an actionable solution to their loneliness.

And of course, it wouldn’t be Valentine’s Day without dating apps. “Bumble,” “Tinder,” and “free dating apps” are all featured throughout the map.

So don’t be embarrassed if your Valentine’s Day search history is a bit questionable — you’re not alone.


More like this: This Valentine’s Day survey will answer your most pressing questions before the big day

The post Each US state’s most popular Google search on Valentine’s Day appeared first on Matador Network.

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