Disclaimer: This is a user generated content submitted by a member of the WriteUpCafe Community. The views and writings here reflect that of the author and not of WriteUpCafe. If you have any complaints regarding this post kindly report it to us.

From cream cheese to creme eggs, companies and suppliers are adapting to the need for vegan products in Sri Lanka. It's never been so amazing for vegans! It's just a matter of learning what to look for while you're out shopping in your cart.

Even the most meticulous reader will make errors, particularly when seemingly innocuous items are discovered to be non-vegan. It can be a little overwhelming to see E numbers in pizza, silk in shampoo, pearls in deodorant, Vitamin D3 in cereal, and glycerine in shower gel.

Did you know that once they've been washed, apples can be covered in shellac? And, just in case your soya milk isn't quite as milky as you'd like, several producers have been known to add whey powder! But don't be discouraged. As I realized that doing my weekly grocery shopping was taking me three hours, I tried to educate myself about which ingredients are vegan-friendly and which are not.

We can only strive to be vegan as long as it is practical and realistic in a non-vegan environment. Many cases, such as assembly lines that are not devoted to vegan products, are likely to have any unintended exposure from animal substances. Vegetarian goods are a positive sign that you're on the right track and they don't have many of the additives that a vegan would like to stop. Keep an eye out for eggs, dairy, and insect-derived things like silk, honey, beeswax, and shellac. Stop lanolin from sheep's fur, and can be used in certain soaps, cosmetics, and creams.

Imagine being able to pick up any food in any store and instantly know whether or not it is appropriate for vegans based on the label? Encouraging the makers of your favorite products to apply for our Trademark is a fantastic way to promote our work and still making it possible for you to go vegan. Simply write a friendly email or letter to a business whose product you recently purchased – or failed to purchase because you couldn't say whether it was vegan or not.

If you're still unsure, do a fast internet check or contact the maker directly. Many businesses provide a declaration or may have a list on their websites. Smartphone games, such as Is It Vegan?, are also available. Remember that there are certain ‘rules' to following when purchasing vegan-friendly products. Juice with a lot of pulp, for example, is less likely to have been filtered with animal products. Furthermore, since organic citrus fruits like lemons are likely to be waxed with shellac for a ‘normal' finish, non-organic citrus fruits could be cleaner. However, only unwaxed fruit will be healthy, so inquire in-store for more details. Remember that lanolin is likely to be the source of Vitamin D in cereal unless it is mentioned as D2 or Vitashine (the only plant-based D3). This is why all Kellogg's cereals are sadly not vegan-friendly.

Vegetables, beans, seeds, and juices, as well as plant-based oils, are vegan products. They may also contain fermented foods like tempeh and tofu, as well as seitan, which is made from vital wheat gluten. Freshness and the average mix of ingredients that make up the complete diet are the two significant factors to remember. With the addition of a few vitamins and minerals that must be supplemented, a vegan diet will have all of the nutrition you need. Vitamin B12, vitamin D, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, iodine, iron, calcium, and zinc are among them. Any of these minerals can be found in plants, so you must consume enough of the right foods to meet the everyday requirements. If you're unsure, a simple blood test can be obtained.

Looking for a sticker that says “Suitable For Vegans” or a “Certified Vegan” tag is the best way to tell whether a food is vegan. Scanning the ‘Allergen Details' is another easy process. If the substance includes dairy, eggs, or fish, the allergen ingredients list will say so. Look for the Green Dot to see if it's vegetarian. If the first two methods don't yield results, look at the ‘Ingredients List.' You will look for non-vegan ingredients and substances in this section. So what can you be on the lookout for? Animal products and animal extracts can be used in perhaps the most seemingly harmless products, such as cookies and cosmetics.

close

Log In

Or with username:

Forgot password?

Don't have an account? Register

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.

Login